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Seven Tips for Integrating Bulbs Into Your Landscaping

Seven Tips for Integrating Bulbs Into Your Landscaping

Here’s How You Can Integrate Bulbs Into Your Landscaping

Nothing says spring quite like bulbs. Varieties like tulips, daffodils, and lilies are perhaps the quintessential marker that winter is over at last. There’s a great variety of bulbs beyond these three well-known classics, and knowing how to integrate them into your landscaping can keep your property looking beautiful all growing season long.

Work Bulbs Into Existing Landscaping

Likely, you have existing landscaping you’d like to improve. Bulbs can be a great way to add some extra color and interest to the landscaping you already have. Here are a few ways to incorporate bulbs into your current design:

  1. Use clusters of color – plant bulbs in irregular clusters of 12 or more for the larger bulbs and as many as 50 or more with the smaller, less showy bulbs. Use pops of one color near shorter shrubs or larger clusters of two or three colors in more open areas between plantings.
  2. Plant a border – use a border of low-growing bulbs like hyacinths to form a border around existing planting areas. Be sure not to plant straight lines of bulbs in ordered rows, which can look too formal for many gardens.
  3. Plant with companions – plant bulbs with companion perennials of a similar size. After the blooms die off, the perennials will help disguise the remaining foliage.
  4. Use bulbs to brighten tree plantings – early spring bulbs like crocus, early daffodils, and grape hyacinths do well under deciduous trees since they bloom before the tree’s full foliage develops. However, do not plant bulbs beneath evergreen trees – these produce too much year-round shade.

10 Landscaping Improvements to Make this Spring

Bulbs Can Be Beautiful Alone

Sometimes, unfilled spaces seem to be begging for a bulb garden. Luckily, the sheer variety of bulbs ensures a space full of bulbs will never get boring.

  1. Arrange bulbs purposefully – plant shorter varieties near the front, with taller ones near the back. Keep in mind which bulbs will bloom when, so you don’t have entire sections of your bulb garden bare as one time.
  2. Mass plantings – address mass plantings of one type of bulb and large groups of multiple bulbs similarly. Plant in natural-looking clusters to get a uniform texture. Also, consider mixing leaf types – mix variegated leaves with plain for a natural, creative look.
  3. Try container gardens – use containers of bulbs to extend your landscaping onto your deck or patio. Plant containers in the fall, winter them in a garage and then bring them out in the spring for an early pop of color.

Check Out Our 17 Landscape Trends for 2019

Contact us for more information about bulbs that will perform best with your existing landscaping.


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can help build an outdoor living area that will have you enjoying the great outdoors in style!  Give us a call today! 302-764-0408

10 Landscaping Improvements to Make this Spring

With all the artic weather that has hit our area these past few weeks, it may be hard to imagine that spring is upon the horizon. Just as the sun surely rises, so will the sunny warmer days of spring and summer be here soon.

That is why we thought a little talk about improving your landscaping this spring might be helpful for planning some improvements to enhance your home’s curb appeal.

10 Landscaping Improvements to Make this Spring:

1) Plan your landscape: Well before you break ground, it is important to plan your landscaping project. Are you going to hire a professional landscaper? Might as well get them involve from the beginning, as their knowledge and expertise will be a big help. Plan for the types of plants you would like to grow, the layout and what you need to complete the tasks. This will make your landscaping endeavor significantly easier in the end.

2) Know Your Options: The geographic location of your home should play a big part in landscaping decisions. Choosing plants according to the climate of your yard is crucial. If your yard is full of mature trees, you will want to select plants that thrive in shade. While a more open landscape will make those plants that thrive in sunny conditions a better option.

The Side Effects of a Late Spring on Your Plantings

3) Give Plants Room to Grow: Most plants have an estimated maturity height and width. Consider a plant will grow over time in order to space it properly and place in best area for growth.

4) Know Your Pests: Familiarize yourself with the pests in your neighborhood so that you can plan for ways to protect your landscape from them. Insecticides, wire mesh or fencing can keep wildlife and insects from destroying your new plantings. Your local nursery or department store should be able to help you find the tools you need.Consider Soil Conditions: The quality of the soil used will play a big part of your landscaping efforts. Adding mulch to your plantings not only adds to aesthetics, it will also help maintain the soil.

5) Consider Maintenance Needs: If you are not planning on spending the time or hiring someone to maintain your plantings, select plants that are lower maintenance to keep your landscape looking nice. Consider placing flowers in planters to add color and texture to the landscape while cutting back on need to weed.

5 Steps to Prepare Your Landscape for Spring

6) Style Your Landscape to Compliment Your Home: The specific style of your home needs considered when selecting plantings. A traditional style home with landscape that flourishes with sunlight is conducive to flowering plants and shrub, while a rustic or modern home might look better with cacti or ornamental grass.

7) Use Landscape Rocks: Rocks can provide a natural, textural element to any landscape and a great way to create focal points. Better yet, rocks are very easy to maintain.

8) Make a Blueprint: Once the types of plants are selected, map it out. Items such as walkways or decorative elements need to be added in order to see how the landscape project will work and the materials you need.

Check Out Our 17 Landscape Trends for 2019

9) Timing is Everything: Since many plants respond better when planted during a particular time of year, you’ll want to plan for that to give them every chance of flourishing year over year.

10) Spy on Your Neighbors: Look around your neighborhood to see what is working for them as a guide to what might work well for your landscape, as well. Talk with a local nursery to get professional advice on what types of obstacles or what is native to your area.


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can help build an outdoor living area that will have you enjoying the great outdoors in style!  Give us a call today! 302-764-0408

rejuvenative pruning

What Is Rejuvenative Pruning and Why Do You Need It?

Over time, your landscaping can become less sharp than it once was. Throughout the changing of the seasons, your shrubs and bushes can begin to lose their shape and look unhealthy around the edges. Fortunately, you can take a few steps to help give your landscaping a facelift. One of these is rejuvenative pruning.

Most shrubs benefit from annual pruning. The practice keeps them from becoming overgrown and producing branches that are unproductive or unattractive. Once a shrub is overgrown, it no longer responds to the typical methods of thinning and trimming. As a result, more drastic actions, such as rejuvenative pruning, become necessary.

Rejuvenative pruning is a good option for shrubs that have not been maintained with annual trimming. When performed correctly, it works as the name implies. It is like replacing the old shrub with a new one. Rejuvenative pruning, at its most basic form, requires cutting the shrub to a height between 6-12 inches and allowing it to grow. However, since it requires a certain technique to be successful, it is best not to attempt rejuvenative pruning yourself.

Hard Versus Gradual Pruning

rejuvenative pruning Rejuvenative pruning, when done correctly, allows a plant to grow new, productive branches after cutting away any productive growth. Two main methods exist for rejuvenative pruning: gradual or hard. A hard prune is the act of cutting the whole shrub down and allowing it to regrow. Gradual pruning, on the other hand, involves the removal of unproductive branches over a period of three years.

Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. The main advantage of hard pruning is that it allows a shrub to rejuvenate more quickly, typically over a growing season. However, not all types of plants respond well to hard pruning, and attempting it on a plant that does not respond well could result in loss of the plant. Additionally, you may have to deal with the unsightly prospect of a bare stub until the plant rejuvenates.

Gradual pruning is a slower process than hard pruning, but it has the advantage of visual appeal. These plants tend to look better in your existing landscaping as they regrow, and are better for types of shrubs that do not respond well to hard pruning, such as caning shrubs.

Rejuvenative pruning can be a great way to improve your landscaping, but it requires help from an expert. The landscaping team at DiSabatino can help your shrubs and landscaping reach their full visual potential.


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can help build a outdoor fireplace or fire pit to keep you warm over the winter months ahead. Give us a call today! 302-764-0408

17 Landscaping Trends for 2019

Check Out Our 17 Landscape Trends for 2019

With every year there comes change, improvement and trends to access. At DiSabatino Landscaping we are always looking to learn new things and explore our creativity in order to deliver the best landscaping product or service to our clientele.

With that in mind, we’ve come up with a list of landscaping and outdoor living trends to look out for and consider this year.

17 Landscape Trends for 2019:

1) Younger customers: As I get older, everyone else starts to look younger. Over my many years in the landscaping business, I have notice that we are getting a large amount of millennials contacting us for major landscaping and hardscaping projects.

2) Integrating technology: Landscaping companies are utilizing all sorts of technology to the benefit of their clientele. Whether it is the use of a drafting program during the design and build stage, retractable awnings or solar powered lighting; expect increased integration of technology.

3) Battery-powered equipment: Cordless-electric outdoor power equipment has gained more power and dependability to the point that is becoming a formidable competitor of gas-powered equipment. Keep in mind when purchasing several pieces of battery operated lawn tools that it might make sense to stick with the same brand so you can use the same battery for several different pieces of equipment.

solar lighting

4) Low-maintenance landscapes: People are working longer hours and looking for ways to cut back on home and outdoor maintenance. Low-maintenance plantings, cutting back on the amount of grass you must mow and installing automatic irrigation systems are just a few of the low-maintenance landscaping strategies you can take to lessen your workload.

5) Pollinator gardens: Many gardeners are stepping up to the plate to protect our native bee species whose population has greatly declined due to pesticides, habitat loss or other ecological changes. Create pollinator gardens with the best bee plants and nesting habitats according to the particular native species you are trying to help.

6) Asymmetrical design: Abstract landscaping or asymmetrical design is key to creating landscaping results that are pleasing, artistic and free form. This gives a more natural and relaxed impression that is less dependent on the shape of your garden and more concentrated on creating unity through the use of a variety of elements such as rocks, plant and décor.

Secluded garden bench

7) Secluded spaces: Secluded Garden Spots or garden rooms are a great way to build an outdoor sanctuary to escape the everyday stress of life. A quiet place to sit and ponder or read can be soothing and reinvigorating.

8) Creating a “staycation” spot: More and more families are creating an outdoor oasis in their backyard where they can enjoy each other’s company, nature and extend the square footage of their home. Creating outdoor kitchens, dining areas, recreation or living areas is a great way to have a place to staycation every weekend!

9) Making backyard structures focal points: The ambience of sharing a nice bottle of wine while relaxing outside with a roaring fire is one of the best ways to wind up a long day. Creating an outdoor space to focus on you is going to be one big trend going forward.

10) Making a notable first impression: The entrance to your home is the first and often the most lasting impression friends and family will get when visiting. Many homeowners are investing in landscaping combined with hardscaping to make that impression a good one.

11) Including unexpected elements in your arrangements: Get creative! A café table set next to a lily pond, a lighted stone bridge leading to a welcoming sitting area, a tall urn fountain – these unexpected features will wow visitors and sooth the soul.

12) Including food in landscapes of all sizes: When planning your landscaping, include plants that provide food, cover and water for wildlife. This will ensure a lively and thriving garden while providing much-needed habitat restoration.

13) Giving back with gardens: The ‘Giving Garden’ is trending as a way to give back to the community. Many organizations are encouraging the giving garden as a way to foster sustainable community values while making an immediate impact on food security.

14) Investing in furniture that lasts: Outdoor furniture is subject to many abusive natural elements, such as the sun’s rays, high winds, pelting rains and sleet. Many homeowners are looking for more durable and sustainable features in outdoor furniture, such as concrete, stainless steel, synthetic wicker or teak furniture, which is a dense, close-grained hardwood with a natural oil content that makes if resistant to the elements.

3 ways to enjoy your backyard with protection from the elements 15) Pergolas: A pergola can provide protection from direct sunlight, yet allow air to circulate freely. This makes them a welcome respite from the harsh rays of the afternoon sun. Making a pergola the perfect feature of an outdoor living space.

16) Pink hues Pink promises to be the most popular hue in landscaping this year. Picture a lovely English garden on a sunny spring day. Expect to see a lot of pink hued knockout roses, delphinium, carnations, dogwoods, hydrangea, foxglove and petunias.

17) Metals: Metal landscape edging, corrugated metal sculptures or tall privacy screens are finding a niche in the landscapes of today. Metal is durable and weathers well, why hasn’t this become a ‘thing’ much sooner?


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can help build a outdoor fireplace or fire pit to keep you warm over the winter months ahead. Give us a call today! 302-764-0408

5 Watering Tips for Your New Plantings

5 Watering Tips for Your New Plantings

You just invested time, money and energy installing new plantings into your landscape, keeping them watered and hydrated is the most important aspect in helping them become established. While there is no universal rule of when and how much to water, the general rule of thumb is one inch of water per week.

Obviously, your watering amount and frequency will be determined by what Mother Nature offers up. On those hot and dry weeks of summer, there is a higher need to keep your new plantings hydrated.

5 Watering Tips for Your New Plantings:

Mulch is an excellent way to keep new plantings healthy 1) Mulch is an excellent way to keep new plantings healthy, as it keeps soil moisture and temperature more evenly regulated.

2) Spring plantings tend to need a more diligent watering routine versus fall plantings, as the root establishment may only be a few weeks. Fall plantings generally need less watering due to cooler temperature and increased rainfall and the roots will be more established that first summer.

3) It is better to water new plantings in the morning, as it is considered more effective. Daytime watering is less effective due to evaporation. Excess moisture that is not absorbed into the soil during the morning will evaporate, keeping plants from too wet during the day or into the night.

4 Steps to Optimal Plant Health for Your Landscaping

4) Fully analyze a drooping plant before assuming that it needs water. While this is a sign of dehydration, it could also be a sign of a plant being starved of oxygen. The cause could be that the plant has been overwatered and the soil is saturated.  Check the soil to see if it is really dry before watering.

5) Avoid oversaturating your new plantings. Puddling is a sign that the plant cannot absorb water at the rate it is being applied. Overwatering can cause root rot, foliar diseases and deprive the soil of oxygen.

The Side Effects of a Late Spring on Your Plantings

The Beauty of Mass Plantings

Why Less is More: The Beauty of Mass Plantings

Mass planting embodies simplicity because it reads as one large element instead of a wide variety of individual plants.

As a lover of plants I often become bogged down when trying to decide how many types of plants to use in a design. When I go to a nursery or garden center, I start thinking how many of each different plants I can get into my personal garden. Then I stop myself and wonder, “Do I really want to take care of all those different types of plants? Do I really need that many different types?”

Ornamental plants for landscaping.

Most of us have limited amount of time to spend on tending our gardens. That is why scaling beds back to a limited palette of long lasting, animated perennials that are low maintenance or grasses that offer a different look for each season makes for the easier way to go.

How to Create a Sustainable Garden that Helps Wildlife

Mass planting embodies simplicity because it reads as one large element instead of a wide variety of individual plants.

Mass planting embodies simplicity because it reads as one large element instead of a wide variety of individual plants

The first step is to decide on an overall look of your landscaping.  Do you want a variety of small shrubs, simple groupings of different grasses, or maybe you’d like an assortment of large herbs, small flaxes and shrubs?

Don’t forget to take into account colors. Are you looking for a bold and dramatic contrast of colors or do a variation of complimentary colors?

Finally, choose mass plantings suitable for your climate. This will mean a better look with less maintenance and budget-friendly.

NATIVE PLANT FINDER

Over the years my designer’s eye has come to appreciate simple, effective and minimal different types of plants in a garden. Planting in masses leads to a larger splashes of color & interest. No matter the size of the space I have found less varieties of plants actually compliments their surroundings more. Less is more!

How to Have Success With Crapemyrtles in Your Landscaping

How to Have Success With Crapemyrtles in Your Landscaping

Anyone who has travelled in the south during mid-summer has surely taken note of the Crapemyrtles throughout the area. The crapemyrtle, often referred to as the ‘lilac of the South’, boasts showy blooms that attract bees and provide habitats for a wide variety of birds.

How to Have Success With Crapemyrtles in Your LandscapingWhy Homeowners Should Be Positive About BEES in Their Landscape

The common crapemyrtle is a native of China and Korea. Crapemyrtles come in a variety of sizes and colors. Thanks to the hybridizing efforts on the part of the National Arboretum and several Crapemyrtle enthusiasts, this colorful specimen has made its way north for the last several decades.

From luscious colors of blooms to smooth bark and dense foliage, the crapemyrtle is the center of attention in any landscape. The tree is not only known for its beauty, but also for it hardiness and dependability.

Those of us at DiSabatino Landscaping would like to share our knowledge with you on have success with your Crapemyrtles in the mid-Atlantic region (zone 5-6). Below is a list of the basics when caring for this hardy tree in your landscaping.

Basic Care of the Crapemyrtle:

Plant in Well-Drained Soil:Planting your Crapemyrtle in a raised bed, berm or sloping area is ideal. Beware of planting flush with the ground, ESPECIALLY if your soil has a high clay consistency. Areas of your landscaping that tend to puddle or stay damp after a rain will inhibit a crapemyrtle from surviving the winter, as the stem tissue will not harden off properly. Crapemyrtles are naturally drought tolerant.

Crapemyrtles Love Heat: A sunny spot in your landscaping is ideal as Crapemyrtles easily abide extra heat that occurs near a south-facing wall or fence. If full sun is not available, they will thrive with ½ day sun.

Fertilize in Spring: A crapemyrtle blooms on current year’s growth, it is suggested to use either ‘Plant-tone’ or ‘Flower-tone’ or a comparable product. Mature plants tend to need less fertilizing. Do not fertilize after July as the resulting new growth will not harden off properly before frost hits and will die back in the winter.

Trim in Early Spring: It is best to trim from mid-March to early May before the new growth appears. While later trimming will not hurt the plant, it may delay or eliminate flowering. A trimmed branch will take 6 to 8 weeks of hot weather before it will bloom. It stands to reason, anything trimmed after June will most likely mean no blooms for the season. A big NO-NO is to trim after July, as the new growth will not be ready for winter.

Treat for Japanese Beatles: Treat for Japanese beetles in June or July if they become an issue in your area.

Except for newly planted Crapemyrtles, do not water or fertilize in the fall. It is best to have drought stress versus too much lush soft growth, as you want the stems to harden off for the winter. Crapemyrtles are the most accommodating plants, thriving in dry, full sun and requiring less maintenance that most trees and shrubs.


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can design an outdoor living environment that will add quality to your life and value to your home. Give us a call today! 302-764-0480

Don't Let Boxwood Blight Take Out Your Boxwoods!

Don’t Let Boxwood Blight Take Out Your Boxwoods!

Don't Let Boxwood Blight Take Out Your Boxwoods!Since early 2010, the Boxwood Blight has been slowly moving its way from the Carolina’s to the Delaware Valley region. During this period, our landscapers have noticed this issue at only a handful of our maintenance properties but we want to keep a sharp eye out for this Blight. Boxwood blight has been found in (18) states and is primarily on the East Coast. This Blight; if left unchallenged; in your yard will wipe out all of your Boxwoods!

Q: What is Boxwood Blight?

A: Boxwood Blight is a fungal disease that affects only Boxwoods. This fungus, Cylindrocladium buxicola, is found on the leaves, stems, base, and even the soil.

Q: Why is this an issue?

A: Boxwood Blight causes a blackening of the leaves and stems that will eventually lead to the death of the plant. This fungus, introduced by infected new plants, can spread quickly to older established landscapes. Once the disease has spread, there is no cure for the blight and the plant will quickly diminish.

Q: How is this spread?

A: Boxwood Blight is commonly spread during warm and humid temperatures. In the nursery, many growers have hundreds of Boxwoods growing near each other at a time; and this can cause an outbreak. DiSabatino has been ONLY purchasing Boxwoods from state certified growers in order to ensure this Blight does not come into your garden. These growers must follow stringent rules to become certified and during any inspection; typically multiple per season; if the blight is found all growing blocks are closed down and all infected Boxwoods are destroyed to ensure containment.

In the home landscape however Boxwood Blight is spread through multiple sources. The most common is planting infected materials from non-certified growers/sellers. Another is improperly cleaned pruning tools. When pruning Boxwoods all tools are to be cleaned with an alcohol based cleaner after every plant. Cloths being in contact with the fungus can even spread the Blight; it is always best to clean all cloths once finished in your garden.

Q: What can I do to save my infected Boxwoods?

A: Unfortunately, there is NO CURE for this Blight. The only way to remove this from your garden is to remove the plant entirely; including all soils around the plant and take it to an appropriate dumping site. DO NOT take this to a local dump that will shred the material. The infected plants MUST be burned to eradicate the fungus.

Q: Should I still plant Boxwoods?

A: Yes, Boxwoods are still an important plant in our area and as long as Disabatino Landscaping is taking care of or installing your Boxwoods, we are always vigilant to ensure this disease does not spread on our watch.

For further information, please go to:

Boxwood Blight: Emerging Threat to Pennsylvania’s Landscape

The Side Effects of a Late Spring on Your Plantings

The Side Effects of a Late Spring on Your Plantings

Is Spring Here Yet?

By Adrienne Angelucci

As many of you may have noticed, Mother Nature has not quite made up her mind as to whether she wants to continue the blustery saga that characterized winter 2017-2018 or allow us the pleasure of an actual spring.

As a result, we along with the plants in our gardens are frustrated and not quite sure how to dress and how to react. With colder temperatures, random snow showers, and blustery winds, expect the signs of spring and plant emergence from trees to perennials to annual flowers to be arriving later than usual.

Although difficult, we will need to be patient with plants this year and give them time to react to warmer temperatures and weather that is more consistent.

The Side Effects of a Late Spring on Your Plantings One easy way to help determine if plants are simply slow to emerge or dead are a simple scratch test. Using a small knife or even your fingernail, scratch the bark to reveal the internal stem. If green, the plant remains viable; if brown, this portion of the plant may have died back.

The important thing to do is to make sure you test numerous branches in the plant in various locations. This will give you an overall sense, as it is normal for plants to have some dieback here and there. The scratch test may reveal that only the upper portion of the plant is damaged and the internal portion is viable. For this situation, a light pruning will help to promote rejuvenation.

In addition to an overall delay, the highs and lows of this winter were especially hard on broadleaf evergreens (any plant that maintains its leaf in the winter that does not fall into the conifer category). Many plants, including Nandina, Laurel, Azalea, Boxwood, etc.. , subjected to the constant undulation in temperatures, freeze/thaw cycle and harsh winds, are showing signs of winter burn and or defoliation.

EFFECTS  OF A LATE FREEZE ON BLOOMING SCHRUBS AND TREES

You may notice this as some of the plants have brown and rust color areas with plants appearing like they have been singed in a fire. Essentially, the plant is showing damage from dehydrated plant cells.

Unfortunately, there is very little can do to treat winter burn. Recommendations will depend on the severity of the burn. For mild burn, proper feeding (fertilizing) and watering will help.

The reality of winter burn is that patience comes into play again. Waiting to see if the plant pushes new buds and seeing how the plant regenerates is the ultimate answer. Unfortunately, successful rejuvenation can sometimes take an entire season if not more.

At this point, it may be more beneficial to remove the plant and consider replacement. Proper planning is key for winter burn protection; the installation of wind breaks, burlap, or application with anti-desiccants prior to winter can help.

Unfortunately, these methods are not the end all, depending on how Mother Nature is feeling. So a little patience, TLC and fortitude will be needed heading into this growing season. If you have questions, DiSabatino Landscaping has answers. Call us to assess your plantings – we can help identify what ones to nurture and which ones need replaced.


Tree and Shrub Care Specialist DiSabatino Landscaping is Delaware’s #1 Hardscape and Landscape Specialist. We can design an outdoor living environment that will add quality to your life and value to your home. Give us a call today! 302-764-0480

Many rely on bees to spread their pollen

Why Homeowners Should Be Positive About BEES in Their Landscape

I DO NOT WANT ANY BEES IN MY LANDSCAPE!

I DO NOT WANT ANY BEES IN MY LANDSCAPE!

I hear this remark all the time from homeowners for whom I design landscapes. It makes me ask, “Why not”?

Unfortunately, bees have gotten a bum rap by homeowners in the last 20 years or so. People unfairly view Bees as an angry and aggressive intruder in the backyard, an unwanted guest with the sole purpose of ruining your backyard barbecue with family or friends, which simply is not true.

The main purpose of bees is to collect pollen The main purpose of bees is to collect pollen (for their hive) or distribute pollen (on other plants) to aid in the development of fruit on those plants.  Pollen provides a valuable food source for bee larvae back in the hive.

Without pollen, bees cannot produce honey, bee larvae will die, and with a hive losing its ability to sustain itself through the creation of new generations of worker bees, will simply perish.

The spreading of pollen from one fruit or vegetable plant to another is how the plant forms fruit…and from that fruit, creates the necessary seed that will allow that plant to reproduce itself again for future generations.

Many of the food crops we enjoy, such as corn, wheat, apples, tomatoes, and blueberries, all rely on bees to spread their pollen.  Without the efforts of those pollinating bees, the world’s agricultural industry would collapse!

Homeowners are often afraid of bees for fear of getting stung by them.  By nature, bees are not aggressive, unless they must protect their hive from physical threat.  Hornets, yellow jackets, and wasps (which do not resemble bees at all) are more likely to be aggressive and sting an unsuspecting human visitor in the landscape.

I have been an active gardener for over 30 years and cannot recall ever being stung by a bee.

What bees and other pollinating insects can bring to a landscape is movement…and life!Many rely on bees to spread their pollen

Sitting in a quiet space in your landscape and watching bees hover and dance from one flower to the next gathering pollen on their legs is almost hypnotic.  For many gardeners, watching bees in their landscape definitely lowers their blood pressure.

Think about these points the next time you see bees in your backyard, and you are tempted to run for the aerosol spray insect killer.